Tips for writing for travel blogs

Tips on writing for travel blogs

I have been trying to break through into the travel industry for a year now. However, getting established as a professional is not easy and takes work. I have had to learn a lot along the way. This includes hundreds of proposal rejection letter. The good news is that from where I started to where I am now, I have come a long way. Picking up a few gem advice and tips that I wish I knew before starting my path. So I have decided to write this post for anyone who is just starting out travel writing. Or for the younger me out there who is about to venture into the unknown without a map. Here are 5 simple tips I learned that may help you on your path to travel writing.

5 tips when writing for travel blogs

Tips for writing for travel blogs

In Stockholm city centre getting inspiration

Do your research. Find you niche

The travel writing market is huge. There are so many different niches within travel that you may want to find out what you like before jumping into the ocean. Here are a few area Within travel and leisure you may want to look at:

  • Adventure travel
  • Airline travel
  • Aviation Airplanes
  • Bed and Breakfast inns
  • budget travel
  • Camping
  • Car rental charter jets
  • City Guide and information
  • Cruise ship reviews
  • Cruising
  • Destination tips
  • First time cruising
  • Golf travel and resorts
  • Hiking backpacking
  • Hotels accommodations
  • Limo rentals limousines
  • Luxury cruise
  • Outdoors
  • Pet-friendly rentals
  • Sailing
  • Ski resorts
  • Staycations
  • Timeshare
  • Travel planning
  • Vacation homes
  • Vacation rentals

Read the guidelines!

Always stick to the editor’s guidelines! You can usually request the submission guideline from the editor of your target publication. No point writing 1000 words if the editor only requests 500-word count. The guideline will usually include style guide and mandatory requirements such as including the name of writer or any photo credits. Some are strict and some are less formal. Here is an example of a submission guideline from www.urbantravelblog.com

Tone of voice

I would advise you to find out what your preferred writing style or tone of voice is before settling on a niche. It would greatly help in finding your success in the travel writing industry. Your unique selling point is your unique style. If you are able to find a niche that caters to your style of writing and you feel at home within the topics, then writing will become natural and fun. Trying to cater to every market can be a struggle and very uninspiring. However, don’t take my word on it. Just watch the video below that sums it up very nicely.

Grammar, spelling and punctation

I know it can be boring. However, it is still important. If you do not take the time to correct your errors then the editor will certainly not have the time to publish your article. They get sent so many submissions that they have no time to correct every error and mistake you make. This does not have to be a torturous task either. There are many free tools that can help to correct errors or add new grammar suggestions. Just google free grammar spell checker and see what is out there. No need to get hung up on the technical stuff for too long because you have got to get back to writing.

Write something useful

Editors are not stupid. They know the difference between a well thought out and useful written piece than a submission stuffed with keywords with nothing of value to contribute to their site. Take your time to do your research. Think about what would you want help or advice in? What problems have you come across in travel that you would like the answers to? A good piece of advice will not just have words but a step by step how to approach on how to solve the problem. With useful suggestions to with credible a relevant links to sources. Add some pictures or video to for added effect and you have a great piece of work.

To read more tips, advice and posts on writing, just click here to see more.

 

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